SinoCarioca Tea Storage

SinoCarioca Tea Storage

In 1808 The Portuguese Royal family moved to the city of Rio de Janeiro, shortly after in 1812 the first group of Chinese immigrants arrived in Rio.
These Chinese Immigrants came to Brazil to cultivate tea which was much appreciated by the Portuguese and the English both of whom emigrated to Brazil between 1808 and 1820.
The purpose of the tea plantations was to supply the European market, especially the English. Macau natives along with tea cuttings, were brought over from Macau, a past Portuguese territory in China.

This tea storage cabinet entitled “Sino-Carioca” celebrates a significant moment in Brazilian history while highlighting the notion of cultural hybridity.  The top drawer is made of maple wood stained using the exact colour of green tea when applied onto wood. The intricately carved legs are inspired by the typical 19th century Portuguese furniture aesthetics.

This tea storage cabinet entitled “Sino-Carioca” celebrates a significant moment in Brazilian history while highlighting the notion of cultural hybridity.  The top drawer is made of maple wood stained using the exact colour of green tea when applied onto wood. The intricately carved legs are inspired by the typical 19th century Portuguese furniture aesthetics

Upon opening the drawer, one discovers a colourful replica of a painting by German artist Johann Moritz Rugendas (1802-1858) depicting the first Chinese immigrants planting tea in the Botanical Garden of Rio de Janeiro. This illustration was first published in the book “A Picturesque Trip through Brazil", whose text references a community of 300 Chinese in the city planting sprouts in the Botanical Garden of Rio.

My aspiration in creating this piece was to illuminate the significance that Chinese immigrants implemented into Brazilian society.

Design 2017

Maple, oil on canvas, acrylic and glass

Unique Piece

SinoCarioca Tea Storage

SinoCarioca Tea Storage

In 1808 The Portuguese Royal family moved to the city of Rio de Janeiro, shortly after in 1812 the first group of Chinese immigrants arrived in Rio.
These Chinese Immigrants came to Brazil to cultivate tea which was much appreciated by the Portuguese and the English both of whom emigrated to Brazil between 1808 and 1820.
The purpose of the tea plantations was to supply the European market, especially the English. Macau natives along with tea cuttings, were brought over from Macau, a past Portuguese territory in China.

This tea storage cabinet entitled “Sino-Carioca” celebrates a significant moment in Brazilian history while highlighting the notion of cultural hybridity.  The top drawer is made of maple wood stained using the exact colour of green tea when applied onto wood. The intricately carved legs are inspired by the typical 19th century Portuguese furniture aesthetics.

This tea storage cabinet entitled “Sino-Carioca” celebrates a significant moment in Brazilian history while highlighting the notion of cultural hybridity.  The top drawer is made of maple wood stained using the exact colour of green tea when applied onto wood. The intricately carved legs are inspired by the typical 19th century Portuguese furniture aesthetics

Upon opening the drawer, one discovers a colourful replica of a painting by German artist Johann Moritz Rugendas (1802-1858) depicting the first Chinese immigrants planting tea in the Botanical Garden of Rio de Janeiro. This illustration was first published in the book “A Picturesque Trip through Brazil", whose text references a community of 300 Chinese in the city planting sprouts in the Botanical Garden of Rio.

My aspiration in creating this piece was to illuminate the significance that Chinese immigrants implemented into Brazilian society.

Design 2017

Maple, oil on canvas, acrylic and glass

Unique Piece

 

SinoCarioca Tea Storage

SinoCarioca Tea Storage

In 1808 The Portuguese Royal family moved to the city of Rio de Janeiro, shortly after in 1812 the first group of Chinese immigrants arrived in Rio.
These Chinese Immigrants came to Brazil to cultivate tea which was much appreciated by the Portuguese and the English both of whom emigrated to Brazil between 1808 and 1820.
The purpose of the tea plantations was to supply the European market, especially the English. Macau natives along with tea cuttings, were brought over from Macau, a past Portuguese territory in China.

This tea storage cabinet entitled “Sino-Carioca” celebrates a significant moment in Brazilian history while highlighting the notion of cultural hybridity.  The top drawer is made of maple wood stained using the exact colour of green tea when applied onto wood. The intricately carved legs are inspired by the typical 19th century Portuguese furniture aesthetics.

This tea storage cabinet entitled “Sino-Carioca” celebrates a significant moment in Brazilian history while highlighting the notion of cultural hybridity.  The top drawer is made of maple wood stained using the exact colour of green tea when applied onto wood. The intricately carved legs are inspired by the typical 19th century Portuguese furniture aesthetics

Upon opening the drawer, one discovers a colourful replica of a painting by German artist Johann Moritz Rugendas (1802-1858) depicting the first Chinese immigrants planting tea in the Botanical Garden of Rio de Janeiro. This illustration was first published in the book “A Picturesque Trip through Brazil", whose text references a community of 300 Chinese in the city planting sprouts in the Botanical Garden of Rio.

My aspiration in creating this piece was to illuminate the significance that Chinese immigrants implemented into Brazilian society.

Design 2017

Maple, oil on canvas, acrylic and glass

Unique Piece

SinoCarioca Tea Storage

SinoCarioca Tea Storage

In 1808 The Portuguese Royal family moved to the city of Rio de Janeiro, shortly after in 1812 the first group of Chinese immigrants arrived in Rio.
These Chinese Immigrants came to Brazil to cultivate tea which was much appreciated by the Portuguese and the English both of whom emigrated to Brazil between 1808 and 1820.
The purpose of the tea plantations was to supply the European market, especially the English. Macau natives along with tea cuttings, were brought over from Macau, a past Portuguese territory in China.

This tea storage cabinet entitled “Sino-Carioca” celebrates a significant moment in Brazilian history while highlighting the notion of cultural hybridity.  The top drawer is made of maple wood stained using the exact colour of green tea when applied onto wood. The intricately carved legs are inspired by the typical 19th century Portuguese furniture aesthetics.

This tea storage cabinet entitled “Sino-Carioca” celebrates a significant moment in Brazilian history while highlighting the notion of cultural hybridity.  The top drawer is made of maple wood stained using the exact colour of green tea when applied onto wood. The intricately carved legs are inspired by the typical 19th century Portuguese furniture aesthetics

Upon opening the drawer, one discovers a colourful replica of a painting by German artist Johann Moritz Rugendas (1802-1858) depicting the first Chinese immigrants planting tea in the Botanical Garden of Rio de Janeiro. This illustration was first published in the book “A Picturesque Trip through Brazil", whose text references a community of 300 Chinese in the city planting sprouts in the Botanical Garden of Rio.

My aspiration in creating this piece was to illuminate the significance that Chinese immigrants implemented into Brazilian society.

Design 2017

Maple, oil on canvas, acrylic and glass

Unique Piece

SinoCarioca Tea Storage

SinoCarioca Tea Storage

In 1808 The Portuguese Royal family moved to the city of Rio de Janeiro, shortly after in 1812 the first group of Chinese immigrants arrived in Rio.
These Chinese Immigrants came to Brazil to cultivate tea which was much appreciated by the Portuguese and the English both of whom emigrated to Brazil between 1808 and 1820.
The purpose of the tea plantations was to supply the European market, especially the English. Macau natives along with tea cuttings, were brought over from Macau, a past Portuguese territory in China.

This tea storage cabinet entitled “Sino-Carioca” celebrates a significant moment in Brazilian history while highlighting the notion of cultural hybridity.  The top drawer is made of maple wood stained using the exact colour of green tea when applied onto wood. The intricately carved legs are inspired by the typical 19th century Portuguese furniture aesthetics.

This tea storage cabinet entitled “Sino-Carioca” celebrates a significant moment in Brazilian history while highlighting the notion of cultural hybridity.  The top drawer is made of maple wood stained using the exact colour of green tea when applied onto wood. The intricately carved legs are inspired by the typical 19th century Portuguese furniture aesthetics

Upon opening the drawer, one discovers a colourful replica of a painting by German artist Johann Moritz Rugendas (1802-1858) depicting the first Chinese immigrants planting tea in the Botanical Garden of Rio de Janeiro. This illustration was first published in the book “A Picturesque Trip through Brazil", whose text references a community of 300 Chinese in the city planting sprouts in the Botanical Garden of Rio.

My aspiration in creating this piece was to illuminate the significance that Chinese immigrants implemented into Brazilian society.

Design 2017

Maple, oil on canvas, acrylic and glass

Unique Piece

 Inspiration for the Sino Carioca Tea Table. Illustration by Johann Rugendas depicting The Chinese Tea Plantation in the Botanic Gardens at Rio de Janeiro around 1814.  Rugendas was a German painter, famous for his works depicting landscapes and ethnographic subjects in several countries in the Americas, in the first half of the 19th century.

Inspiration for the Sino Carioca Tea Table. Illustration by Johann Rugendas depicting The Chinese Tea Plantation in the Botanic Gardens at Rio de Janeiro around 1814.

Rugendas was a German painter, famous for his works depicting landscapes and ethnographic subjects in several countries in the Americas, in the first half of the 19th century.